Activity Report
from Indonesia

Development of community business models by utilizing photovoltaic power generation systems

In 2018, Panasonic installed two Power Supply Stations (PSS); one on the premises of the P3M training center of Yayasan Dian Desa, a partner organization, and another in Marsedan Raya village. We will help the communities to increase income through the creation of food processed from local freshwater fish and agricultural products by utilizing electricity.

Agriculture and natural honey processing utilizing local resources, knowledge and kills

At its training center, Yayasan Dian Desa is providing a variety of training programs to local residents. For example, they grow the much-talked-about superfood moringa, and other crops. Currently, they are carrying out tests to dry harvested moringa leaves with room heaters powered by electricity generated by PSS. They will work on developing local products utilizing dried moringa leaves (September 2018).

Organic fertilizer production Since the Kalimantan Island consists of reddish soil inappropriate for agriculture, it is required to improve the soil by using fertilizers. Therefore, the training center is providing a program to produce an organic fertilizer to grow quality vegetables. The process is to cut branches and leaves of leguminous Mucuna trees indigenous to the island, add bacteria, and age them. Surrounding villages started to test this fertilizer in their fields. Currently, purchased chemical fertilizers are generally used. By switching to an organic fertilizer, it is expected to reduce both environmental and household economic burdens.

photo:Organic fertilizer production

Superfood moringa growing and processing Moringa grown from seedlings or cuttings are harvested around six months later, for sorting, cleaning, and drying. Leaf drying tests are underway to develop local products using the superfood. Efforts are being made to establish manufacturing processes that will ensure stable quality since room temperature must be kept at 40˚C or below to prevent leaf fermentation or discoloring. As moringa is not familiar or eaten in the community, some people are participating training to learn how to make moringa useful to develop their community.

photo:Superfood moringa growing and processing

Local residents are carrying out tests to produce fried crackers by mixing dough made from the freshwater fish caught in the river with dried moringa, which have a slightly bitter flavor. The product is being developed by leveraging moringa and characteristics of the region along the large river where large quantity of freshwater fish are available.

photo:Local residents are carrying out tests to produce fried crackers by mixing dough made from the freshwater fish caught in the river with dried moringa, which have a slightly bitter flavor. This project is being carried out by leveraging regional characteristics, including the abundance of freshwater fish along the large river, and moringa.

Collecting and processing honey

In the purpose-built small building located on the premises of the training center, local residents are learning and working to collect and process honey.They collect honey with a plum-like flavor from natural honeycombs where the nectar of diverse flowers blooming in Kalimantan is condensed, and then filter out impurities.

photo:In the purpose-built hut located on the premises of the training center, local residents are working to collect and process honey. They collect honey with a plum-like flavor from natural honeycombs where the nectar of diverse flowers that bloom in the State of Kalimantan is condensed, and then filter out impurities.

In the drying room where electricity generated by PSS is utilized, they increase the honey's sugar content by removing water for three days using desiccant. Subsequently, they will establish the condensing process required for producing higher-quality honey, develop packages, and take the step to promote sales.

photo:In the drying room where electricity generated by PSS is utilized, they increase the honey's sugar content by removing water for three days using desiccant. Subsequently, they will establish the condensing process required for producing higher-quality honey, develop packages, and take the step to promote sales.

Efforts of a women’s group to make processed food with freshwater fish in Marsedan Raya village

A women’s group organized to enhance the sense of unity in their village is testing the processing of foods made from fish caught in the Kapuas river, including dried snakehead fish powder for sprinkling over rice and dishes and dumplings made from the fish meat. They have prepared these foods on two occasions in response to orders from village residents. They will further improve the taste and quality to develop quality products (September 2018).

The group consists of 16 active women living in Marsedan Raya village. They have developed products, including traditional textiles and bags, and have expertise in distribution.

photo:The group consists of 16 active women living in the village of Marsedan Raya. They have developed products, including traditional textiles and bags, and have expertise in distribution.

Freshwater fish caught in nearby river is processed to make dumplings. Fish meat is kneaded into the shape of a rod, boiled, and then cut. The fish tastes better if you dip the dumplings in the sauce. Since production is currently in the test phase, it will require time, efforts, and improvements made through trial and error to achieve a taste on par with that of existing marketed products.

photo:Freshwater fish caught in nearby river is used for dumplings. Fish meat is kneaded into the shape of a rod, boiled, and then cut. The fish tastes better if you dip the dumplings in the sauce. Since production is currently in the test phase, it will require time, efforts, and improvements made through trial and error to achieve a taste on par with that of marketed products.

The women are trying to produce dried snakehead fish powder for sprinkling over rice and dishes. It is soft, and has a sweet taste seasoned with spices peculiar to Indonesia. As with the case of fish dumplings, they will further improve the taste, and examine effective marketing measures.

photo:The women are trying to produce dried snakehead powder to sprinkle over rice and dishes. It is soft, and has a sweet taste seasoned with spices characteristic to Indonesia. As with the case of fish dumplings, they will further improve the taste, and examine effective marketing measures.

A hut to process food was built next to PSS. Preparations are moving ahead for the full-fledged launch in the spring of 2019.

photo:A hut to process food was built next to PSS. Preparations are moving ahead for the full-fledged launch in the spring of 2019.

Support learning about electricity and develop technical instructors

Training programs have started with facilitation of Yayasan Dian Desa. As the first step, a workshop was held for local cadres, during which explanations were given on photovoltaic power generation systems that will provide renewable energy. The objective is for them to become familiar with the methods of utilizing electricity as well as PSS operations, maintenance, and management (September 2018).

A total of 27 local cadres participated in the workshop, including youth leaders, representatives of cooperatives, and village heads. All of them had a positive outlook on the development of their community, and were interested in photovoltaic power generation systems. We expect them to disseminate the information they acquired during the training programs, and examine options to adopt electricity generated by PSS for their activities.

photo:A total of 27 local resident representatives participated in the workshop, including younger individuals, a cooperative association, and the village mayor. All of them had a positive outlook on the development of their community, and were interested in photovoltaic power generation systems. We expect them to disseminate the information they acquired during training programs, and examine options to adopt electricity generated by PSS for their activities.

Active area

photo:Indonesia active area

Indonesian Indonesia

Semitau and Suhaid, Kapuas Hulu, West Kalimantan

The villages are scattered along the Kapuas river, the longest in Indonesia. Villagers are making a living in fishing or agriculture. It is expected that electricity will be used for processing freshwater fish and agricultural products. There is no electricity infrastructure in place. However, in some villages, the government provides a solar panel to every home.

Donation equipment:Power supply station(PSS), Ene-loop solar storage
Partner organizations:Yayasan Dian Desa, Asian Community Center 21

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Other active areas

Myanmar Myanmar

Baingbin Senna Village, Ayeyawady Region

Contribution to the improvement of lives and education with photovoltaic power generation systems and lighting

The village has a population of 1,845. Although the government has been undertaking electrification projects, the residents will have no access to electricity for at least five more years since the village is located in a remote area. 95% of the population are engaged in agriculture, with their income coming mainly from the double cropping of rice and beans. The schools in this village aim to achieve a high school enrollment rate of 40%.

2018.07.13The donation ceremony was held on July 13, 2018. Pictures of the ceremony are shown here.

Kenya Kenya

Enkutoto District, Narok County

Aid to Bring Electricity and Improve Life for the Maasai

Near the border of Tanzania, there is a village where 3,700 Maasai live. There is no industry in this region. The only resource is farming cattle and goats. Daily expenses per family average $2.5. The majority of households are below the poverty line. The nomadic Maasai are recently beginning to live in settled areas, but their lifestyles still depend on their traditional pasturing and small-scale agriculture. In part due to the effects of climate change, they find it difficult to escape from poverty. Only 36% of Kenyans have access to electricity, and only 12% in rural villages. This village is one without access to electricity.

2019.1.31The donation ceremony was held on January 29, 2019. Pictures of the ceremony are shown here.
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